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Teemu Ullgrén

Late May Finnish Red Cross opened an Emergency Response Teddy Clinic in connection with the annual World Village Festival, celebrating multiculturalism in downtown Helsinki.

Minna Passi

The need for help is still great in Nepal, particularly in the remote areas. The mobile clinics of the Finnish Red Cross will be located in the badly damaged Dolakha district that lost half of its healthcare clinics in the earthquakes.

Maija Tammi

Senginuyava Fitness is one of the more than 100,000 refugees who have fled Burundi due to the ongoing violence in the country.

Jaakko Jaskari / Finnish Red Cross

European governments are wrong if they think they can cut off the flood of refugees crossing the Mediterranean by sending fleets to destroy the vessels of human smugglers, said the Vice-President of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the Kenyan doctor Abbas Gullet.

IFRC/Carl Whetham

The Finnish Red Cross has received numerous questions about how best to help the afflicted people in Nepal. At the moment, the most efficient way to get help to those in need is via the Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund. The collected funds are used for emergency relief and acquisition of materials for people who have lost their homes.

Carl Whetham / IFRC

Finnish Red Cross sent an emergency response unit, specialized in logistics, to Kathmandu airport, Nepal. This single international airport in the country is, and will be for the foreseeable future, a hub for incoming aid. There are only a couple of land routes into the country, and the roads are difficult to negotiate.

Everyone has the right to get help. A person might need help at home or in the street, and the need for help is almost always sudden. During the Red Cross Week between 4th and 10th of May, the Red Cross emphasises the first aid skills of young people, in particular.

Jarkko Mikkonen

The Finnish Red Cross is set to send to aid workers and emergency response units to Nepal.

Basheer al Selwi

Approximately 16 million people are in need of humanitarian aid. There is a constant danger of running out of food, water, and fuel.

Annika Lindroos

Syrian refugees now arriving at the Azraq camp are in a weaker condition than before.

Suomen Punainen Risti

As migration increases, the number of missing persons has also increased in Europe. The national Red Cross organisations look for missing family members throughout Europe.

Niklas Meltio / Suomen Punainen Risti

The Finnish Red Cross and Land Rover begin collaboration. The objective is to offer clean water and better health for 24,000 people in Tajikistan, the most impoverished country in Central Asia.

Petteri Kivimäki

The Finnish Red Cross conducted an election survey for the leaders of the parliamentary parties in January. The leaders were grilled about their stances on supporting family caregivers and receiving quota refugees, for example.

Lisa Pattison / IFRC

A man painstakingly lectures his family on the importance of hand washing while the house next door is under quarantine. What could seemingly be a scene of an Ebola affected community is in fact the set of the Sierra Leone Red Cross’ new soap opera, Advice.

Leena Koskela

In the international first aid group, language is not a barrier for learning important skills. The goal of the multicultural group is to get to offer aid in different events next autumn.

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Tatu Blomqvist

The members of parliament and the Minister of the Interior Päivi Räsänen received the Red Cross’ petition calling for immediate action concerning acceptance of Syrian refugees and increasing the refugee quota. The Minister of the Interior promised that the refugee quota would be raised.

Ibrahim Malla

Petitioning for the reception of Syrian refugees, will be addressed to the representatives of the various groups of the Finnish Parliament On Friday, 7 March.

Arto Tulima

The Finnish Red Cross and the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health have updated the way they work together on preparedness for accidents and in first-aid operations. The new agreement means that in a situation of public disturbance the Red Cross can, for the first time, also begin to coordinate other volunteer groups, in addition to the Voluntary Rescue Service.

Verneri Ruohoranta

The ski slope volunteer is both a skier and a helper, who is quickly on the spot when accidents happen. Eija Häkämies from Kouvola is on duty while spending time with her family.

Mari Mäkinen

The Christmas Spirit Campaign collects money for less fortunate Finnish families with children.

Jarkko Mikkonen

The schoolyard of the International School in Espoo is filled with a sea of red collector vests. Over 170 middle school students have gathered wearing Red Cross attire to participate in the Hunger Day Walk.

Alejandro Lorenzo

Finland quiets down for the summer, but Red Cross volunteers work where vacationers are on the move.

Niklas Meltio

The disaster drill brought together the organization’s volunteers, ”evacuees” and retirement home staff, among others. The Midwinter event was a rehearsal of action in the middle of a winter storm.

Kaisa Sirén

The Finnish Red Cross arranges its first national disaster-preparedness exercise called Midwinter rehearsals on the 16th of February.

Jukka Uotila / The Finnish Medical Association

The ‘Paperittomat’ network (‘the undocumented network’): Equal access to healthcare services is a fundamental human right.

IFRC

The Finnish Red Cross launches an emergency appeal for funds on March 14. The Finnish Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund needs donations to prepare for helping victims of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Over a two-week period, Finns have donated some EUR 2,5 million to the Finnish Red Cross Haiti Collection. Until now, funded by the Finnish Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund, the Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs and ECHO, the FRC has sent to Haiti a mobile clinic, a field hospital operating theatre, a hospital ward with 100 beds, aid supplies, and 34 aid workers

The Finnish Red Cross continues its efforts in Jokela. The Red Cross stand-by team of psychologists provides support for students and teachers at the Jokela School Centre to help them carry on with their daily lives.

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On 17 February, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) will mark its 150th anniversary and commemorate the beginning of its efforts to bring relief to millions and improve the lives of countless people adversely affected by armed conflict.

Johanna Lassy-Mäntyvaara

Treating injured victims of the drawn-out and increasingly brutal conflict in Syria are part of everyday life at a hospital in Amman, Jordan. Thanks to the efforts of the Red Crescent, at least some of the tragic stories here will have a happy ending.

Jarkko Mikkonen

Since last August, nurse Tiina Saarikoski has been in charge of the International Red Cross cholera operation in Sierra Leone.

Sana Tarabishi

Syria is in dire need of help. All aid materials are quickly distributed to those in need.

Joe Cropp / IFRC

The Finnish Red Cross supports the flood operations in the Philippines by donating €50,000 from the Disaster Relief Fund.

Sarah Oughton / IFRC

The Sahel area countries are experiencing a food crisis affecting over 16 million people. The need for humanitarian aid in the Sahel area is extreme.

P. Yazdi

Particularly Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia are headed towards a humanitarian crisis due to drought. The Red Cross provides relief aid to the areas in most critical condition.

Noora Kero

Each morning around six o’clock, Finnish Red Cross aid worker Pauli Immonen wakes up in his tent at the Port-au-Prince airport. Having had breakfast, he is off to the logisticians’ meeting at the nerve centre of the International Red Cross, the main camp, from which the Haiti operation is coordinated.

Noora Kero

Nikenson Fabre (29) has an important role at the Finnish Red Cross mobile clinic in Port-au-Prince.

The International Red Cross is preparing to help quake victims in Haiti over at least a three-year period. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies estimate that some 60,000 families, or some 300,000 people, are in need of aid. The IFRC now estimates that providing them with aid over three years will cost a total of EUR 73 million.

A second batch of relief supplies leaves the Finnish Red Cross logistics centre in Tampere today, en route to Haiti. The supplies, including 240 family tents big enough to house a family of six, are first transported to Berlin by lorry. Also bound for Germany are 600 tarpaulins which can be used to build temporary shelters. In Berlin the Finnish supplies will join a German Red Cross field hospital and be flown to Port-au-Prince.

On Friday, 15 January 2010, the Finnish Red Cross has sent a mobile clinic to the earthquake zone in Haiti. A total of twelve aid workers have also been sent to Haiti to get the clinic up and running, and will then work in it. Eight of the aid workers are from Finland, two from Sweden and two from France.

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